Tucson

Welcome to the Old Pueblo!
 

Tucson (/ˈtsɑːn, tˈsɑːn/SpanishTucsónO'odhamCuk-ṢonNavajoTó Oostsʼąʼ) is a city in and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States,[6] and is home to the University of Arizona. It is the second-largest city in Arizona, with a population of 520,116 in the 2010 United States Census,[3] while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263.[7] The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second most-populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border.[6] Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

Major incorporated suburbs of Tucson include Oro Valley and Marana northwest of the city, Sahuarita[8] south of the city, and South Tucson in an enclave south of downtown. Communities in the vicinity of Tucson (some within or overlapping the city limits) include Casas AdobesCatalina FoothillsFlowing WellsMidvale ParkTanque VerdeTortolita, and Vail. Towns outside the Tucson metro area include Benson to the southeast, Catalina and Oracle to the north, and Green Valley to the south.

Tucson was founded as a military fort by the Spanish when Hugo O'Conor authorized the construction of Presidio San Agustín del Tucsón in 1775. It was included in the state of Sonora after Mexico gained independence from the Spanish Empire in 1821. In 1853, the United States acquired a 29,670 square miles (76,840 km2) region of present-day southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico from Mexico under the Gadsden Purchase.[9] Tucson served as the capital of the Arizona Territory from 1867 to 1877.[10] Tucson was Arizona's largest city by population during the territorial period and early statehood until it was surpassed by Phoenix by 1920. Nevertheless, population growth remained strong during the late 20th century. In 2017, Tucson was the first American city to be designated a "City of Gastronomy" by UNESCO.[11]

The Spanish name of the city, Tucsón [tukˈson], is derived from the O'odham Cuk Ṣon [tʃʊk ʂɔːn], meaning "(at the) base of the black [hill]", a reference to a basalt-covered hill now known as Sentinel Peak. Tucson is sometimes referred to as "The Old Pueblo".

About the Neighborhood

There are community events
Neighbors are friendly
There's holiday spirit
Great schools
Car is needed
It's walkable to grocery stores
It's walkable to restaurant
Great hospitals
Parks and playgrounds
Lots of wildlife
Beach life
Golfing
Walking / Hiking trails

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